Why Is Cave Diving So Dangerous? What Are The Reasons?

Why Is Cave Diving So Dangerous? What Are The Reasons?


Underwater Equipment Device For Scuba Drivers

Why is Cave Diving So Dangerous? The question is often asked when a person wants to understand about Cave Diving. Cave Diving is a thrill not meant for people with a fine heart. It is an extreme adventure. Only a handful of people in the entire world can go for Cave diving.

Why Is Cave Diving So Dangerous? What Are The Reasons?
Why Is Cave Diving So Dangerous? What Are The Reasons?

Thomas Iliffe experiences; Why Is Cave Driving So Dangerous?

Thomas Iliffe is a veteran cave diver. He also teaches at the A&M university. He specializes in saltwater cave dive systems. Cave diving has been his passion for over 40 years now. His insight has helped many scientists and researchers to explore and study marine. He has delved into thousands of caves around the globe. Moreover, I explored cave diving when there was no awareness. He narrates about the dangerously placid caverns and caves. He also talks about the risks that involve this fabulous thrill. The person is a marine biologist and his interest lies in animals that live very deep in the sea. He defies the use of the term ‘spelunking’. Spelunking means exploration of the caves as a hobby. He says that only cave divers can go in the caves and not people who teat diving as a hobby.

Thomas says he started exploring Bermuda Island. There are hundreds of unexplored caves. There is some untouched and unseen biology in them. He learned cave diving from experts there. He formed a team with his friends and then explored caves all around the globe. Bermuda was a breakthrough in his research because he learned a lot from there.

Why Is Cave Diving So Dangerous? What Are The Reasons?
Why Is Cave Diving So Dangerous? What Are The Reasons?

Underwater Wildlife

According to Thomas, there is a lot of undiscovered wildlife that lives deep down under. The biology is untouched and unexplored. He has a team of geologists mappers and researchers who help him navigate and inspect animals while they are still alive. He has photographers in his team who do justice to his findings. They take pictures that help researchers and scientists back on land. He deals mostly with animals that live below the line of freshwater, in the depths of salty water. These animals have not been in contact with sunlight. They do not swim to the surface. They are exclusive because they are found only in specific regions. The biology found underneath is rare and undisturbed.

However, Thomas is glad not many people can reach such depths or else they might disturb their eco-balance. According to him, the apparatus that they carry is very important. In Cavern diving, the oxygen cylinders can be carried at the back. Whereas in cave diving, they are carried on either side. Two cylinders are needed. There are times when there is very little space to swim. In such a case, the cylinders are unclasped and put in the front. Nowadays, the CO2 exhaled can be recycled through a scrubber and is reusable. The diver inhales this again and again. Another important apparatus is the reel which is the guiding thread for divers.

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